[Review] KILLA – MIRAE

Last week, we saw the debut of a few groups which I have yet to review. I am hoping today I will finally get around to reviewing all of them (sounds ambitious given my track record). The focus of today’s review is MIRAE, a new group under DSP Media (the home of APRIL and KARD). MIRAE is a seven-member male group, consisting of Lee Junhyuk (former Produce 101 X contestant), Son Dongpyo (former Produce 101 X contestant and X1 member), Kael (former Under Nineteen contestant), Park Siyoung (former Under Nineteen contestant), Lien, Jang Yubin and Yoo Douhyun. They made their debut on 17 March with the title track and mini-album of the same name, KILLA.

KILLA is a powerful song, tapping into the EDM genre of music for MIRAE’s debut song. But I feel that KILLA seems to take things that step further, which differentiates their EDM release from other releases that fall into the same genre. And that is something that I really look for in new releases. Let’s start from the beginning of KILLA. The song opens with its chorus and very blastful electro-house in the background. From the get-go, the song is loaded with intensity and power, making it is a fulfilling way to start the song. The song then moves into the verses, with introduces us to MIRAE’s rap line. The pre-chorus features the vocal line and adds some smoothness to the song in the otherwise texturally loaded song. Both the vocal and rap line that form MIRAE are very skilled. Both rose to the occasion to match that loaded intensity we got from the instrumentation. The second verse is delivered by a mixture of the two factions of the group and they really work with each other to continue the song’s momentum. Fast-forwarding to after the second chorus, we enter the bridge, which is where I believe KILLA starts to detour away from its competition. We are first hit with a bit of an electric guitar which adds an electrifying and undoubtedly exciting energy to the song. This is then followed up with a slowed down vocal section, which quickly ramps back up to a distorted EDM breakdown (uniqueness here, as I don’t think I have heard any song distort EDM in the way KILLA‘s producers have). We are then quickly blasted by a return of some powerful and angsty rapping from Junhyuk, which felt perfect to lead into the final chorus. Overall, I feel that KILLA was a very strong song to start off their debut with. If you enjoyed the thrill of songs like SEVENTEEN’s HIT, then I am sure KILLA would be an equal compliment to your playlist.

You can tell that DSP Media is really going hard with their investment in MIRAE. Everything in this video was top notch in terms of editing, set design and graphics. The music video that accompanies the release of KILLA quite futuristic (a fair amount of neon lights, robots, screens and holograms were observed). I am unsure if Junhyuk is stuck in a technological limbo, but he makes the call to all of his fellow MIRAE members to band together which we see them all do once they get his message. I also like the traditional touch that the video had, which gave the video an extra level of attraction. The glitching graphics make total sense when it comes to the bridge of the song. But I was completely convinced my laptop was playing up when we got to that part the first time. However, after the video wrapped up, I was completely in awe with how cool the resulting product ended up being.

It comes as no surprise that the performance was as powerful as the song. I really enjoyed the dance break, with their robust moves really complimenting the intense energy we get from that sequence of the song. It does seems like they had to tone back their energy to allow for a live performance (which makes complete sense). But I am not disappointed in that, as they managed to wow me with the performance nonetheless. And if I needed additional convincing to do so, this performance really makes me want to keep an eye out for future MIRAE releases.

Song – 9/10
Music Video – 9/10
Performance – 9/10
Overall Rating – 9/10

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