[Review] MOVE – TNX

Something I have been doing unintentionally this year is pushing song reviews for rookies aside to cover the bigger releases. So, as we are gearing towards award season (nudge nudge, hint hint), I thought I take some time to cover some more rookies. I kick things off with TNX (stands for The New Six), a six member male group under P Nation. The group was formed through the TV show LOUD and features Taehun, Kyungjun, Hyunsoo, Junhyeok, Hwi and Sungjun as part of its lineup. They debuted back in May of this year with the single MOVE and the mini-album WAY UP.

MOVE doesn’t offer anything new or make much of an impression on me – probably why it was bumped so often. And this is the biggest downfall of MOVE for me. It just felt like a standard electronic dance release from a multitude of male groups currently active in KPOP. If you were expecting something fresh, different or intriguing, than I would not recommend TNX’s debut. But if you are after a release that is mainstream, then MOVE is the release for you. Per usual, there were aspects of the MOVE that I did enjoy. But if you read through my blog, the things I am about to point out are pretty much common in other releases as well. I did like the thumping aspect of the instrumental, which gave off a dramatic flair. For this song, it was much needed to give the song some definition, which I thought was lacking in MOVE. The group shows off solid rapping and vocals through the verses and pre-choruses, respectively. There is some potential, but I just wished we got to hear them in a less polluted atmosphere (i.e. the instrumentation). Some definition (again) would have helped the members in MOVE, just so they sound and appear bolstered alongside that thumping and synths used. Talking about synths, the producers of MOVE used pretty ordinary ones throughout the song. I wished they went with more abstract or unique synths than the usual siren-like synth in the verses/choruses or the crunchy one in the choruses. The strings in the bridge were a nice addition, and I liked the way the instrumental concentrates in the final chorus. Moving onto MOVE‘s choruses, I felt the instrumentation overpowered the members, and again I wished there more definition. The hooks weren’t as memorable here, as opposed to the pre-chorus, which was disappointing. Overall, MOVE is a fair release. But I hope we get something better for their first comeback.

Again, the concept for this music video was pretty ordinary. It features a rebellion, lead by the members. The main reason to why I am describing the concept as ordinary, however, is due to the fact that we don’t get much of a backstory. Based on the ending, it appears the rebellion is successful, with the members leaving the lab without anyone hindering them. What I did like about the video was the striking nature of the colours in this video. Probably the most noticeable is the red coloured straps and jumpsuits donned by the members and the background people on the sterile white/light silver clothing and settings. The green (see the feature image) was also striking by dominating much of the set, and I liked the subtleness of the navy in some other scenes (though still striking enough).

Choreography wise, I think this is the strongest aspect of the debut. I really liked the aggression and energy behind the different moves throughout the performance. Their stage presence was definitely strongly felt. I also enjoyed the final sequence, where the song concentrates itself. We also see a similar effect in the performance.

Song – 6.5/10
Music Video – 7.5/10
Performance – 8.5/10
Overall Rating – 7.2/10

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